Tag Archives: Family

Oya Giveaways For The Holidays!

Dear Oya Lovers,

We are SO excited to announce our weekly holiday giveaway! Every Saturday until Christmas this year, one of you will win a FREE OYA! This is a great way to celebrate sustainable gardening with your loved ones.

Here’s how to enter:

On Instagram, post gardening photos using the #Growoya hashtag! That’s ALL you have to do.

On Twitter, Tweet your favorite gardening stories (multiple tweets allowed) OR favorite ways to save water in the garden. Use the hashtag #Growoya to be entered!

On Facebook, comment to share your gardening stories. That’s it! We want to hear about all the love you put into your vegetable bounty. It helps us feel good, and helps inspire all our fellow gardeners to get our hands dirty more often.

We will announce the winner of the week every Saturday morning at 10:00 am PST. Also, you must live in the USA to be eligible (for now).

Can you enter more than once? Yes! We’d love to hear from you on all social media channels! Why just share a story when you could also share a photo? Not everyone has all three, so more people will see it!

Will the post with the most likes win? Any post can win! We like to give everyone a fair chance.

How can I increase my chances of winning? We’re so glad you asked! If you want to be entered twice, there are a few things you can do: On Instagram, comment on friends’ photos about the competition. On Twitter, Tweet at gardening lovers you know. On Facebook, tag friends in your comments! Tag us using @Growoya so that we know you’ve been sharing the love!

Wear Your Salad Around Your Neck

At the National Children and Youth Garden Symposium this week, avid gardeners gathered to show children just how easy it is to grow your own food.

Dr. Marturano started her lecture by giving out necklaces to grow sprouts in overnight. This is her way of showing how fun and easy gardening at home can be. She says

“We’ve made children aware of how healthy eating is important for them but we haven’t really reached the point of changing their behavior,” she said, “but if they grow it themselves, they want to eat it themselves.”

Rick Sherman, a school garden coordinator for the Oregon department of education, was involved in the symposium because he sees the importance of setting up the next generation for success in nutrition and access to vegetables. “It’s our duty as adults to share with kids where food comes from,” he says.

We couldn’t agree more!